Men, put your health first and manage your diabetes

Studies show that men are less likely than women to get medical care. They are also more likely to have unhealthy lifestyles. And they often don’t want to talk about their health or monitor it regularly. If you are a man with diabetes, you can learn how to manage your diabetes and take care of your health.

Diabetes Can Lead to Health Problems

If you have diabetes, you have a greater chance of erectile dysfunction (impotence). That is when a man can no longer have or keep an erection. You may also be at risk for other health issues such as:

  • Stroke and heart problems
  • Eye problems that make you lose your sight
  • Kidney problems that cause your kidneys to stop working
  • Tooth and gum problems
  • Pain, tingling, or numbness in your hands and feet that can lead to the loss of a toe or foot

There are healthy changes you can make every day to help prevent or delay diabetes complications. Like quitting smoking if you smoke, reaching and staying at a healthy weight, being physically active, and following your doctor’s recommendations. Start slow. Even small changes in your everyday life can make a big difference in your overall health.

Start Improving Your Health Today

If you put your health first, there are many ways you can lead a healthier life and manage your diabetes. Regular care by a health care provider is important if you have diabetes. Follow these steps to start taking better care of your diabetes and improve your health:

  • Find a doctor you can trust.
  • Keep all of your doctor’s appointments.
  • Ask your doctor what you can do to avoid or reduce stress.
  • Learn about types of physical activity you could try to reach and stay at a healthy weight.
  • Ask your doctor to help you find a diabetes education program that is right for you.
  • Get support from family members and friends to help you stay on track to manage your diabetes.

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What you need to know about smoking and diabetes

The 2014 Surgeon General’s Report has found that smoking is a cause of type 2 diabetes, which is also known as adult-onset diabetes. Smokers have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than do nonsmokers. The risk of developing diabetes increases with the number of cigarettes smoked per day.

How smoking causes type 2 diabetes

Smoking increases in inflammation in the body. Inflammation occurs when chemicals in cigarette smoke injure cells, causing swelling and interfering with proper cell function. Smoking also causes oxidative stress, a condition that occurs as chemicals from cigarette smoke combine with oxygen in the body. This causes damage to cells. Evidence strongly suggests that both in inflammation and oxidative stress may be related to an increased risk of diabetes.

The evidence also shows that smoking is associated with a higher risk of abdominal obesity, or belly fat. Abdominal obesity is a known risk factor for diabetes because it encourages the production of cortisol, a hormone that increases blood sugar. Smokers tend to have higher concentrations of cortisol than nonsmokers.

What smoking means to people with diabetes 

Studies have confirmed that when people with type 2 diabetes are exposed to high levels of nicotine, insulin (the hormone that lowers blood sugar levels) is less effective. People with diabetes who smoke need larger doses of insulin to control their blood sugar.

Smokers who have diabetes are more likely to have serious health problems, including:

  • heart and kidney disease;
    poor blood flow in the legs and feet that can lead to foot infections, ulcers, possible amputation of toes or feet;
  • possible amputation of toes or feet;
  • retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness);
  • peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs that cause numbness, pain, weakness, and poor coordination).

Even though we don’t know exactly which smokers will develop type 2 diabetes, we do know that all diabetic smokers should quit smoking or use any type of tobacco product immediately. The health bene ts of quitting begin right away. People with diabetes who quit have better control of their blood sugar. Studies have shown that insulin can start to become more effective at lowering blood sugar levels eight weeks after a smoker quits.

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6 Things To Know About Type 2 Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

Diabetes is a group of chronic diseases that affect metabolism—the way the body uses food for energy and growth. Millions of people have diabetes, which can lead to serious health problems if it is not managed well. Conventional medical treatments and following a healthy lifestyle, including watching your weight, can help you prevent, manage, and control many complications of diabetes. Researchers are studying several complementary health approaches, including dietary supplements, to see if they can help people manage type 2 diabetes or lower their risk of developing the disease; however, there is currently not enough scientific evidence to suggest that any dietary supplements can help prevent or manage type 2 diabetes.

Here are 6 things you should know about taking dietary supplements for type 2 diabetes.

  1. A healthy diet, physical activity, and blood glucose testing are the basic tools for managing type 2 diabetes. Your health care providers will help you learn to manage your diabetes and track how well you are controlling it. It is critical not to replace proven conventional medical treatment for diabetes with an unproven health product or practice.
  2. Some dietary supplements may have side effects, including interacting with your diabetes treatment or increasing your risk of kidney problems. This is of particular concern because diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and kidney failure in the United States. Supplement use should be monitored closely in patients who have or are at risk for kidney disease.
  3. Chromium (an essential trace mineral found in many foods) has been studied for preventing diabetes and controlling glucose levels, but research has found it has few or no benefits. There have been a few reports of kidney damage, muscular problems, and skin reactions following large doses of chromium.
  4. There is no evidence that magnesium helps to manage diabetes; however, research suggests that people with lower magnesium intake may have a greater risk of developing diabetes. A large 2007 study found an association between a higher intake of cereal fiber and magnesium and a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Large doses of magnesium in supplements can cause diarrhea and abdominal cramping, and enormous doses—more than 5,000 mg/day per day—can be deadly.
  5. There is no substantial evidence that herbs and other dietary supplements, including cinnamon and omega-3s, can help to control diabetes or its complications. Researchers have found some risks but no clear benefits of cinnamon for people with diabetes. For example, a 2012 review of the scientific literature did not support using cinnamon for type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
  6. Talk with your health care provider before considering any dietary supplement for yourself, particularly if you are pregnant or nursing, or for a child. Do not replace scientifically proven treatments for diabetes with unproven health products or practices. The consequences of not following your prescribed medical regimen for diabetes can be very serious.
https://nccih.nih.gov/health/tips/diabetes

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Interview with Dr. Phil McGraw! Living Well with Type 2 Diabetes.

Dr. Phil McGraw is best known as the host of the top-rated daytime talk show, “Dr. Phil.” He is also an accomplished author, having written eight New York Times No. 1 bestsellers and is frequently called upon for his expert opinion on current events by major national and international news outlets.

Dr. Phil has lived with type 2 diabetes for more than 25 years. He has recently partnered with AstraZeneca for the “ON IT Movement,” an awareness campaign that seeks to empower adults living with type 2 diabetes to take an active role in managing the condition to get on – and stay on – a healthy path. The campaign leverages Dr. Phil’s personal experience living with type 2 diabetes and his professional experience as a former practicing clinical psychologist to engage, motivate and inspire people to commit to take action and more effectively manage their type 2 diabetes. In addition, the ON IT Movement seeks to elevate the national conversation around type 2 diabetes to encourage appropriate action that will better support people living with the condition.


Live Interview with Dr. Phil McGraw! Wednesday May 11th 3:30 pm ET

Join the conversation! May 11th 3:30pm ET, 12:30pm PT
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Join us HERE at the time and date of the event
Dr. Phil McGraw is best known as the host of the top-rated daytime talk show, “Dr. Phil.” He is also an accomplished author, having written eight New York Times No. 1 bestsellers and is frequently called upon for his expert opinion on current events by major national and international news outlets.

Dr. Phil has lived with type 2 diabetes for more than 25 years. He has recently partnered with AstraZeneca for the “ON IT Movement,” an awareness campaign that seeks to empower adults living with type 2 diabetes to take an active role in managing the condition to get on – and stay on – a healthy path. The campaign leverages Dr. Phil’s personal experience living with type 2 diabetes and his professional experience as a former practicing clinical psychologist to engage, motivate and inspire people to commit to take action and more effectively manage their type 2 diabetes. In addition, the ON IT Movement seeks to elevate the national conversation around type 2 diabetes to encourage appropriate action that will better support people living with the condition.
www.OnItMovement.com #OnItMovement.